Mix Design Calculator

calculator

Download our free mix design calculator for cellular concrete. It will help you save time and hassle when creating mix designs and doing cost scenario analysis. It’s useful for determining batch weights, required amounts of water and concrete, and calculating your costs.

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CALCULATOR TUTORIAL

You’ll find the mix design calculator easy to use—with a little guidance.

All settings (except SPG values) are changed using the slider. Only the cells in white can be changed. All other values will update as the values in the white cells are changed.

  1. Starting in the upper left-hand side, set your desired Dry Cellular Density.
  2. Set your desired percentages for Fly Ash or any other Pozzolan. (The SPG for any given pozzolan can also be changed—just enter the new value in the cell). 
  3. Set your Aggregate/Cementitious Ratio, then your Water/Cementitious Ratio, and finally your Sand/Cementitious Ratio. (These can be changed in any order at any time). 
  4. Move back toward the top to Base Slurry Volume and set it to the desired amount. This is done after steps 2 and 3, because as those values change, they’ll affect the Base Slurry Volume. You’ll notice the Cellular Slurry Volume value changes when setting the Base Slurry Volume also. This Cellular Slurry Volume will also change when changing the Dry Cellular Density. 
  5. On the right side set the Cretefoamer Output (this is not relevant for our Continuous Production machine, as this value only affects dose time if batching a truck), followed by Water: Concentrate Ratio, and the Desired Weight of Foam. These are typically set at 40:1 and 3, respectively.
  6. Set the Cost of Foam/Gallon, and at the bottom, the Base Design Cost Per Yard. After these have been set, the calculator will display your Cellular Slurry Cost/Yard. This does factor in the cost of foam concentrate, and it should also be noted that the Desired Weight of Foam and Water: Concentrate Ratio will have an effect on the final cost of cellular slurry. (Increasing either of those values increases the amount of concentrate used).

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